Granby awards Pathway Project to Morrow and Sons | SkyHiDailyNews.com

Granby awards Pathway Project to Morrow and Sons

Granby’s long-awaited Pathway Project took another major step towards fruition last week after the Granby Board of Trustees formally voted to award the project to the contracting firm Morrow and Sons, based out of Fraser, following the Town’s standard bid proposal process.

The winning bid from Morrow and Sons was the lowest bid submitted to the Town for the project and came in nearly $300,000 above the previously budgeted total for the project.

Along with Morrow and Sons Granby also received a bid proposal from Diamond Excavating. The Town is planning to move forward with the project but is currently awaiting approval from the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to utilize a gravel surface for the pathway, as opposed to an asphalt surface, and approval from the Colorado Division of Reclamation Mining and Safety (CDRMS) to use road base and fill material currently located on the Shorefox property; both requests are attempts to reduce total costs on the Pathway Project.

The decision to award the contract to Morrow and Sons came out of a Board Special Meeting convened on Tue. Aug. 30 for the express purpose of allowing the Board to review bid submissions for the Pathway Project and to discuss additional details regarding the pathway’s surface and base materials. The full bid proposal from Morrow and Sons totaled $1,131,925, significantly above the previously budgeted total for the project of $838,000.

Granby Mayor Paul Chavoustie explained the Town is currently awaiting CDOT approval of a gravel surface for the pathway. “We don’t know when CDOT will respond,” Chavoustie said. “We immediately sent that (request) off but it could be a couple of weeks. We hope it is quick. We would like to get it (the Pathway Project) started this fall and finish it this spring but if CDOT doesn’t respond quick enough we may have to wait for the spring to begin.”

If CDOT approves a gravel surface for the pathway, as opposed to an asphalt surface, Granby officials estimate cost savings on the project related to the surface material at around $187,000.

Chavoustie also explained the Town is contacting the CDRMS to request approval to use gravel and other earthen material currently located on the Shorefox property, purchased by Granby this summer, for road base and fill material for the pathway. If the CDRMS approves Granby’s request Town officials estimate an additional $60,000 in cost savings on the project. If both cost saving measures are approved by the State the Town still expects to be about $45,000 over the initially budgeted project total.

The Granby Pathway Project is being funded almost entirely with grant monies. Granby received a $392,000 grant for the project from transportation enhancement funds from CDOT. The Town of Granby applied roughly $100,000 in Town funds to the funds from CDOT; then used the combined funds, totaling $492,000, to apply for a dollar-for-dollar matching grant from the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA).

Several Board members expressed concern that the bid proposal was nearly $300,000 over the initial budgeted amount. To reduce costs associated with the project and bring the bid closer to the original budgeted amount Granby added three stipulations to the motion approved last week that awarded the bid to Morrow and Sons: the project must use Town materials to reduce costs, must have CDOT approval for the omission of asphalt, and the Town needs to make sure money is available to pay for the project.

The Granby Pathway Project will create a pedestrian and bicycle path running alongside US Highway 40 from Kaibab Park, just north of the Fraser River and adjacent to Highway 40, to Thompson Road, the turnoff road to City Market on the southern end of Granby. Previous plans to someday construct a pedestrian overpass above the railroad tracks on Granby’s southern end has been put on hold indefinitely as Town officials work with CDOT to determine a best course of action for rehabbing the existing pedestrian pathway on the bridge that currently spans the railroad.