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Lake Granby spill ends

Water has begun to go over the spillway at the Granby Dam on Lake Granby as seen on Thursday afternoon, July 17. Rain on the East Slope has caused officials to stop diversions through the Alva B. Adams Tunnel, meaning even more water is spilling from Lake Granby. The lake officially started spilling Wednesday, according to Northern Water, when the water level reached 8,279.5 feet. Releases from Lake Granby reached 630 cfs on Thursday, July 17, which includes flows over the spillway and through the river gate. Kara Lamb with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said she expected flows to drop to around 530 cfs by the end of July 17. The Bureau of Reclamation plans to maintain the 530 cfs release through the night into Friday.

Water has begun to go over the spillway at the Granby Dam on Lake Granby as seen on Thursday afternoon, July 17. Rain on the East Slope has caused officials to stop diversions through the Alva B. Adams Tunnel, meaning even more water is spilling from Lake Granby. The lake officially started spilling Wednesday, according to Northern Water, when the water level reached 8,279.5 feet. Releases from Lake Granby reached 630 cfs on Thursday, July 17, which includes flows over the spillway and through the river gate. Kara Lamb with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said she expected flows to drop to around 530 cfs by the end of July 17. The Bureau of Reclamation plans to maintain the 530 cfs release through the night into Friday.

Water that began to spill over the Granby Dam spillway at Lake Granby on Wednesday, July 16, is now headed instead toward the Front Range through the Alva B. Adams Tunnel. The lake officially started spilling last Wednesday, according to Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, when the water level reached 8,279.5 feet. Kara Lamb with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation wrote in an email late Tuesday night, July 22, that the spill had ended and diversions to the Front Range through the tunnel increased to 408 cubic feet per second. Meanwhile, she wrote, releases from the dam into the Colorado River are running at about 70 cfs.

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