Grand Lake bus service idea buzzing | SkyHiNews.com

Grand Lake bus service idea buzzing

It has been a banner year for both Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) and the Town of Grand Lake. But if local entrepreneur Elmer Lanzi has anything to say about it, 2015 will be even better. That's because Elmer is working to establish a bus service in the Grand Lake and RMNP area. Lanzi has already purchased two buses for his coming business venture. The business will use one of the busses for regular transportation services and the second bus will be on permanent stand-by in anticipation of any possible break-downs. The business, which will be called the Buzz with the operators driving "buzz'z", is scheduled to begin transportation operations to coincide with the opening of Trail Ridge Road in May. Lanzi plans to run a bus to the top of Trail Ridge Road and various locations around Grand Lake. He noted that a bus service operates out of Estes Park that also goes to the top of Trail Ridge Road and he hopes to connect with that bus service for the summer season. He also plans to put in a Park-and-ride lot just outside of Grand Lake where the buses will be stored at 12429 Hwy 34, right next to the Blue Bird Motel. "The challenge right now is to get enough interest from the community and the business community to finance and support a bus," said Lanzi. Lanzi hopes to use both public and private sponsorship and advertising to defray the costs of running the bus company. He hopes to hire a total of four employees for the Buzz including two CDL drivers and a dispatcher. He is in the process of applying for and receiving special use permits as well as public service and DOT inspections. The two buses Lanzi purchased came from Snowmass. He said the buses were previously well maintained and were fairly fuel-efficient. Lanzi's idea for the bus company developed out of transportation summit held in Grand Lake earlier in the year. "I had the opportunity to buy the busses at the right price. This looked like an excellent opportunity. I said, 'I think I'll do that," commented Lanzi. The buses are being prepped for a new coat of paint and graphics to be added. Lanzi intends to use a bee logo of some type for his bus company. "It is my hope, my dream and my vision that this will help the economy of our community. Also that the community and the business people will get behind it," he said.

Bus service coming to Grand Lake this summer

If you're looking for a easy and efficient way to get around the Grand Lake area this summer your options are expanding. Mountain Transit Adventures (MTA), a privately owned enterprise, is preparing to begin accepting passengers on its bus system. A fee-free soft opening is scheduled for the last week of June. Mountain Transit Adventures will offer bus rides along a scheduled bus route as well as pre-booked shuttle services to Rocky Mountain National Park and the Arapaho National Forest from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. A shuttle will be available from 6:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. for bars and restaurants. Once the system is up and running, day passes for MTA will cost $12. Local merchants can purchase tickets for resale for $9. Local businesses can also establish bus stops for a monthly fee of $400; which can be shared among businesses and also includes advertising on the busses themselves. The new enterprise is the brainchild of Grand Lake resident Elmer Lanzi. Lanzi purchased two buses late last year with plans of creating MTA and has been prepping throughout the winter for the summer season. The future MTA bus route will service trails, bars, restaurants, private and public campgrounds and Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre. The route will be centered near Pine Beach where a park-and-ride location is under construction. The service will also provide a transportation link for passengers arriving in Grand County via AmTrak train. Bus routes and scheduling are subject to change as the service gets up and running. Mountain Transit Adventures can be contacted at 907-888-1227. Their office is located at 928 Grand Ave., Unit 204, Grand Lake.

Grand County Real Estate Transactions

Scanloch Subdivision Lot 1, Block 2 – Gerald and Jo Ann Shumaker to Dylan and Gabrielle Taylor, $79,000 Winter Park Ranch 3rd Filing, Lot 62, Block 1 – Luanne Kay to Adam Gould and Veronica Callinan, $250,000 Winter Park Highlands Greenridge Lot 16 – Paul and Karen True Trust to Justin and Deborah Bridge, $207,000 Rio Rancho Small Tracts Sub Exempt Lot 1 – Larry and Judith Ware to Hadley and Joan Bradbury, $898,000 Columbine Lake Block 3, Lots 14,15 – Gerald and Kathryne Vanner to Benny and Susan Law, $285,000 Aspen Meadows Condominiums Unit 207, Block C – Aspen Meadows Condominiums LLC to Gordon McGlinchey and Brenda Kraft, $116,900 Winter Park Lodge II Bldg F, Unit 201 – Raymond and Judith Hall to Kenneth Richardson and Kelly Fraser, $137,500 Grand Country Estates TRT 77 – Richard Timothy Parry Living Trust to Cozens Pointe LLC, $65,000 Cozens Pointe at Grand Park Unit 201, Bldg B, Garage Unit B – Cozens Pointe LLC to Richard Parry and Abby Bleistein, $324,000 Villa Harbor Subdivision Lot 18 – Bell Crest Enterprises LLLP to William Henry Peltier III, $365,000 River Run Condominiums Unit 203, Bldg B – PennyMac Loan Services LLC to John and Barbara Rankin, $89,120 Copper Creek Lot 46 – John and Nancy Rice to Bruce Campbell, $299,999 Meadow Ridge Lodges Court 27, Unit 8 – Smith Family Trust to James Reasor and Margaret Copeland, $160,600 Mountainside at SilverCreek C U 111, Timeshare No 111504 – Tom and Louise Massoni to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Owners Association, $500 Mountainside at SilverCreek C U 99, Timeshare No 099649 – Leo and Ann Lussier to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Owners Association, $500 Mountainside at SilverCreek C U 91, Timeshare No. 091535 – Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Owners Association to Michael B Ensley Revocable Trust, $500 E.J. Vulgamotts 1st Block 5, Lots 1,2, Tabernash – Steven and Charlene Hayward to Chuck and Marie Huston, $52,000 Yacht Club Estates Lot 5 – FDIC, Firstier Bank to Gary and Linda Knippa, $1,250,000 Lakota Flg 3, Tract C, Lot 33 – SNAD II LP to M6 Capital LLC, $975,000 Longview Addn/Hot Sulphur Springs Block 15, Lots 10,11,12 – John and Taura Perdue to Roger and Michelle Gable, $213,000 Exhibit “A” Not Attached for Legal Description – Liberty Savings Bank FSB to Allen Schrieber and Suzette Kynor, $13,000 Lakeview Subdivision Unit 2, Lot 1, Bldg B – Fannie Mae Federal National Mortgage Association to Kenneth and Paulette Nolan, $106,000 Hamilton Hills Subdivision Exempt TRT 2 – Patricia Jacques to John and Florice Lietzke, $285,471 Mountainside at SilverCreek B U 064, Timeshare No. 064128 – David and Sharon Anderson to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Owners Association, $500 Mountainside at SilverCreek B U 035, Timeshare No. 035126 – Thomas Farrel and Joann Debruin-Farrell to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Owners Association, $500 Cozens Meadow at Grand Park Lot 3 – Grand Park Homes LLC to Robert and Debra Gnuse, $523,000 Pines at Meadow Ridge Court B U 6, Week 38 – Stephen and Susan Clemens to Naomi Yahn, $1,500 Slopeside Village Unit 113A, Bldg E – Stephen and Cary Paul to James Byerrum, $382,500 Fraser Crossing-Founders Pointe Condominium Unit 3611 – Smith Living Trust to Hyo and Jina Kim, $360,000

Grand Lake Bowling League Results

Las Vegas LeagueJan. 27For the women, Kathy Burke bowled the high scratch game (231) and high scratch series (576). Suzi Maki scored the high handicap game (279), and Brenda Freeman and Melissa Humble tied for the high handicap series at 667.For the men, David Freeman took both high scratch game (226) and high scratch series (598) honors. Kenneth Clark bowled the high handicap game (276), while Garey Sutherby turned in the high handicap series at 712.The latest standings were:TeamWLDiamonds in the Ruff43 25The Rollers4226Bear It All3731It Happens Shhh36.531.5Just Sizzlin3038Up Your Alley2939Grand Lake Lanes27.5 40.5Ace Pluming2642Louies Ladies LeagueFeb. 2Monday Night Louies Ladies Leagues Just Us stayed on top of the team rankings, while Autumn Fisher dominated the lanes with high scratch game (217), high handicap game (257) and high handicap series (668). Rhonda Busse took high scratch series honors with a 551.The post-Feb. 2 standings were:TeamWLJust Us5628Fallen Angels4638Frickin Five Pin4436Lane Hoppers41.542.5Spare Me4143The D Team4044The Gumballs36.547.5Plumb Bobs3153Feb. 9Krys Boy dominated Louies Ladies League knocking over the most pins in every category with high game scratch of 211, high game handicap of 248, high series scratch of 541 and high series handicap, 652 .The post-Feb. 9 standings were:TeamWLJust Us5929Fallen Angels5038Lane Hoppers45.542.5Spare Me4543Frickin Five Pin4439The D Team4048The Gumballs36.551.5Plumb Bobs3256Wednesday Mens leagueBobby Blea had the hot hand, bowling the high handicap game (280) and the high handicap series (732). Arnie Johnson bowled the high scratch game (237), and John McDowell turned in the high scratch series at 650.The latest standings were:TeamWLAlpine Taxidermy35.520.5Heckerts Cleaners31 wins25Power World30.525.5Grumpys Old Men2927BAll Nite Long2828Team Five2333Drink Pillage & Plunder2214 lossesGapers028Thursday Morning Lady BugsFeb. 5Terry Pratt bowled the high scratch (195) and handicap (229) games and high series scratch (500). Yvonne Prather kept her high series handicap title with a score of 622.The post-Feb. 5 standings were:Team WLTeam Rufra137Batman & Robin119Spare Mades1010Jill & Janet812Terry P. & Cindy812Debbie & Yvonne713Feb. 12Terry Pratt had the hot hand again bowling high game scratch (176), high series scratch (513), and high series handicap (615). High game handicap honors went to Sharon Iacovetto with a score of 223.The post-Feb. 12 standings were:TeamWLTeam Rufra1410Batman & Robin1410Terry P & Cindy1212Jill & Janet1113Spare Mades1113Debbie & Yvonne717

Glenwood Canyon daytime closure Tuesday

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) will move forward with a full closure of I-70 in Glenwood Canyon tomorrow, Tuesday, March 8. Daytime closure will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m from exit 116 (Glenwood Springs) to exit 133 (Dotsero). Weather permitting, crews are planning to utilize a helicopter to put rockfall netting in place on the slope where the original slide occurred. The construction team will also take the opportunity to continue road repairs on both the westbound and eastbound decks. Safety closures of the Hanging Lake, Grizzly Creek and Shoshone rest areas remain in effect while traffic is in the head-to-head configuration. Bair Ranch (on the east side) and No Name (west side) rest areas will remain open. The Glenwood Canyon Bike Path remains closed as well. (Please note, local traffic coming from the west can travel as far as No Name; local traffic from the east can travel as far as Bair Ranch during this daytime closure.) ALTERNATE ROUTES/TRAFFIC IMPACTS: Front Range motorists/Summit County/westbound motorists CO 9 (Silverthorne) to US 40 (Steamboat Springs) west on US 40 (Craig) south to CO 13 (Rifle) Eagle County/westbound motorists CO 131 at Wolcott to Steamboat Springs, west on US 40 to Craig, then south on CO 13 to Rifle and back to I-70. This is a 203-mile alternate route that will take about three hours and 50 minutes to travel. This detour adds 146 miles and about three hours to a regular trip from Wolcott to Rifle on I-70, which is 67 miles or about 45 minutes. South alternate route Uses US 50. Access to US 50 is available via Grand Junction for eastbound drivers and for westbound drivers by way of US 24/285 through the Salida area from the Front Range. (Please note, there is construction on US 24 over Trout Creek Pass east of Johnson Village in Chaffee County into early March; some blasting and up to 30-minute delays may be encountered.)

Church Park Fire bill exceeds $1.5 million

Fighting fires isn’t free. The massive initial attack that helped firefighters bring the Church Park Fire under control earlier this month cost the U.S. Forest Service an estimated $1.43 million in the first week alone, according to public affairs specialist Tammy J. Williams. By the time the incident is completely wrapped up that figure is projected to reach $1.5 million. The bulk of that cost, Williams said, some 43 percent, was spent on aircraft, including heavy air tankers, helicopters, lead planes, air attack planes, and retardant for a total of $619,163, according to flight invoices. The remaining cost was estimated based on the amount of time each resource worked on the fire each day. “Since we don’t have access to the exact dollar-per-hour cost of each person on the fire, or a particular individual’s cost to government per hour, a national average cost for a person, or a crew, or an engine, etc, is set up in the computer program and then multiplied by the number of hours the resource worked,” Williams said. An estimated 11 percent of the total comprises equipment cost, including fire engines, WIlliams said. Some 23 percent was spent on paying the U.S. Forest Service’s 20-person firefighting crews and another 13 percent paid other personnel, supervisory and overhead costs. An estimated 5 percent was spent on camp support, including food and showers, and some 3 percent was spent on supplies other than food – cache van, fuel, etc. All those costs are being paid by federal agencies, Williams said. The U.S. Forest Service will pick up 93 percent of the bill and the Bureau of Land Management will pick of the remaining 7 percent of the bill, based on acreage of the fire. Grand County paid for all Grand County resources, including personnel and equipment, for a total of about $113,000, according to Grand County Emergency Manager Trevor Denney. Creating a fire tally is difficult, Denney added, because much of the cost is considered “soft,” such as the contribution of two road and bridge bulldozers, the water tender, the ambulance, the county employee time, the Incident Command Post facilities and the park for the fire camp – things that the county owns or wages that would have been paid anyway. Some of the money spent made its way back into the local economy, Williams said. Firefighters purchased their food individually on Oct. 3 -the day the fire broke out. On Oct. 4, all the food was purchased locally, and caterer Sherry Kent of Showboat Catering/Drive By Pies in Granby served three meals on Monday to about 100 firefighters. After that, the national contract requires the Forest Service to use a national caterer. Some cases of bottled water were purchased locally, and City Market donated a truckload of ice. In addition, the American Red Cross paid for two pallets of bottled water at Safeway, and City Market donated the refrigeration truck and 2 pallets of bottled water. The Forest Service also purchased ice from City Market and Safeway. Approximately 25 portable toilets were rented locally. Verizon provided additional emergency cell phone service. All fuel for the duration of the incident was purchased locally for approximately 50 trucks and vehicles. Snow Mountain Ranch’s Neil Willems donated potable water and the disposal for gray water. Most of the fire personnel camped out, but a few hotel rooms were purchased, the Forest Service spokesperson added.

Grand Lake approves 2016 budget

With 2015 drawing to a close municipalities throughout the state spent the month of December performing a number of perfunctory actions from passing resolutions levying property taxes to ordinances setting fee schedules. The Grand Lake Board of Trustees had their own year-end house cleaning session during their last official meeting of the year. During that meeting the Board approved the town's 2016 budget. Board members and town officials have been developing the budget for some time now and have been conducting budget work sessions for several months. For 2016 Grand Lake's General Fund will begin the year with a leftover fund balance of $1,201,623. The leftover fund balance represents the amount of money remaining in the Town's General Fund at the end of 2015. Grand Lake Town Treasurer Erin Ackerman has budgeted $2,641,747 in revenues for 2016 with the town expected to take in approximately $1,702,900 in General revenue and $938,847 in Capital revenue, or revenue that can be attributed to specific capital expenses. For 2016 Grand Lake is projecting General Fund expenditures totaling $2,873,125. After taking in account both the projected revenues for 2016 and the 2015 General Fund ending fund balance Grand Lake expects to end 2016 with a General Fund balance of $970,244. Budgets for municipalities are developed a year in advance and many of the specific figures within the budget are projections or estimates that can and do change over the course of the year. The projections are based on a number of factors including the future economic outlook and ending tallies from previous years. Grand Lake collects taxes and has expenditures through the end of December every year. Similarly the town has a two-month time frame between the end of any given month and when official figures on revenues and expenditures for that month become available. The budget presented to the Board during the December Trustees' meeting includes projections for 2016 and 2015 year-end totals. The 2015 year-end totals use estimates on expenditures and revenues for November and December. Grand Lake further breaks down their General Fund expenditures by the various departments within town government. The department with the single largest budget is the Grand Lake Public Works Dept. with a total 2016 budget of $577,321. Of the total for the dept. $342,271 is applied to personnel costs while $235,050 is designated for operations. The town's Administrative department has the second highest departmental budget with a total of $553,818, of which $294,709 is for personnel costs while $259,109 is for operational costs. The Public Safety department. had the next highest budget for 2016, though the totals for that department, $193,840, are significantly lower than the totals for both Administration and Public Works. The Parks department. has a 2016 budget total of $119,102 broken down between $48,402 for personnel and $70,700 for operations. The Town has projected a total cost of $90,787 for the Board of Trustees with the entirety of that budget designated as operational costs. The Greenway Committee has a total projected budget of $41,197. The Town's remaining departments; Cemetery Committee, Post Committee and the Planning Commission/BOA, each had projected budgets less than $10,000 with the Post Committee having a projected budget of zero. Grand Lake has projected $130,007 in debt service payments in 2016. The town is projecting $113,961 in debt service payments on Administrative work and $16,046 in debt service for public works projects. The town also sets aside a Tabor Reserve Fund which is set at three percent of the overall General Fund, or $57,566. Grand Lake's 2016 budget is a part of the public record.

Grand County: Four mountain golf course offer fun, challenge

In addition to its excellent wintertime skiing and great mountain biking in the summer, Grand County has become a Mecca for golfers with some of the best mountain courses to be found in the Rockies.Grand County has a total of four courses for golfers to enjoy. The oldest is the Grand Lake Golf Course, which opened in 1968, followed in 1985 by the Pole Creek Golf Course located outside of Tabernash in the Fraser Valley.The countys opportunities for golf were further enhanced in recent years by the opening of two courses in the Granby area. In 2001, the Headwaters Golf Course at Granby Ranch opened its fairways to golfers, followed in 2002 by the Grand Elk Golf Course.Grand LakeCourse name: Grand Lake Golf CourseWebsite: http://www.grandlakegolf.coAddress: 1415 County Road 48, Grand LakePhone number: (970) 627-8872 or (970) 627-8008Type: Public, 18 hole regulationGreen fees: 18 holes, $64; 9 holes, $49Tee times: Call 970-627-8008 for reservations. Weekdays: call seven days in advance.Weekends & Holidays: Can call at 7:00 a.m.Dress code: Shirt and shoes required.Designer: Dick PhelpsTee boxes: Women Red 5,678; Front 9, 35.1/128; Back 9, 35.9/131; 18-hole, 71.0/129Women White 6,310 yards; Front 9, 36.9/135; Back 9, 37.4/141; 18-hole, 74.3/139Men White 6,316 yards; Front 9, 34.6/118; Back 9, 34.9/115; 18-hole, 69.5/117Men Blue 6,542 yards; Front 9, 35.1/121; Back 9, 35.4/117; 18-hole, 70.5/119Practice: A driving range and putting green are available.Amenities: restaurant/lounge, pro shop, beverage cart.Misc. info: Known as the Crown Jewel of Mountain Courses, the Grand Lake Golf Course is an 18-hole championship golf course, carved out of the woods at an elevation of 8,420 feet bordering Rocky Mountain National Park. Its narrowly rolling fairways surround well-tended, subtle greens. The majestic Rocky Mountains, some still capped by the winter snows, tower high above golfers offering exclusive and unique panoramic views. Directions: From Denver or Steamboat, take US Hwy 34 East at the intersection of US Hwy 40 and Highway 34 and go 16 miles to County Road 48 and turn left at the sign marked Golf Course Road. From Estes Park, take the road over Trail Ridge Pass, after leaving the park exit gate, go to County Road 48 and at the Golf Course sign, turn right at the sign marked Golf Course Road.Pole CreekCourse name: Pole Creek Golf Club – Meadow/RanchWebsite: http://www.polecreekgolf.comAddress: 5827 County Road 51, Tabernash, CO 80478Phone number: 800-511-5076Type: Public, 27-hole regulationGreen fees: $69-$99Tee times: Call 970-887-9195 for reservations. Registration can be done 30 days online. Call for reservation if further out than 30 days.Dress code: Collared shirt, spikeless shoes, no cut-offs.Designer: Denis GriffithsTee boxes: Women Red 4,928 yards; Front 9, 34.4/124; Back 9, 34.6/130; 18-hole, 69.0/127Women Gold 5,497 yards; Front 9, 35.4/138; Back 9, 36.1/138; 18-hole, 71.5/138Women White 6,398 yards; Front 9, 38.0/151; Back 9, 38.6/155; 18-hole, 76.6/153Men Gold 5,571 yards; Front 9, 33.0/117; Back 9, 33.5/128; 18-hole, 66.5/122Men White 6,413 yards; Front 9, 34.9/137; Back 9, 36.1/131; 18-hole, 71.0/135Men Blue 7,107 yards; Front 9, 36.6/142; Back 9, 37.1/148; 18-hole, 73.7/145Practice: Grass driving range, putting green and separate chipping green with sand bunker.Amenities: Pro shop are available. On-site catering with clubhouse, restaurant and beverage cart service.Misc. info: Golfers can treat themselves to 27 holes of classic mountain golf on Pole Creeks three distinct courses: The Ranch, The Meadow and The Ridge. Pole Creeks design incorporates existing lodgepole pine, valley meadows, sagebrush and a variety of water hazards including five lakes to create a diverse course appealing to a wide range of golfers. The Ranch 9 and The Meadow 9 wander through lush fields, while The Ridge 9 showcases what golf pro JT Thompson calls the most spectacular view in Colorado.Directions: Take I-70 to Exit 232 (Hwy 40), and go north through Winter Park. At the 220 mile-marker, turn left and follow signs to the course.HeadwatersCourse name: Headwaters Golf Course at Granby RanchWebsite: http://www.granbyranch.comAddress: 2579 County Road 894, Granby, CO 80446Phone number: (970) 887-2709Type: Public, 18-hole regulationGreen fees: $60-$80Tee Times: Available online or call the pro shop.Dress code: Traditional golf attire.Designer: Mike AsmundsonTee boxes: Women Rose 5,310 yards; Front 9, 34.3/118; Back 9, 33.8/123; 18-hole, 68.1/121Women Green 6,024 yards; Front 9, 36.3/123; Back 9, 35.9/131; 18-hole, 72.2/127Men Green 6,024 yards; Front 9, 33.9/115; Back 9, 33.3/111; 18-hole, 67.2/113Men White 6,602 yards; Front 9, 35.1/122; Back 9, 34.9/120; 18-hole, 70.0/121Men Gold 7,210 yards; Front 9, 36.5/131; Back 9, 36.4/122; 18-hole, 72.9/127Practice: Grass driving range and putting green.Amenities: Driving range (double-ended), 3 practice greens, John Jacobs Golf School, snack bar & grill, indoor/outdoor seating, GPSMisc. info: The Headwaters Golf Course is set amid the beauty of the Fraser River Valley just outside the town of Granby. Headwaters provides a beautiful and challenging round of golf for players of all abilities. Elevated tees offer splendid views of mountains, wetlands and lush alpine meadows. Its groomed fairways wind around strategically placed bunkers, lakes and ponds.Directions: Take I-70 to U.S. Hwy 40. Go west about 42 miles to the Headwaters Golf Course/Sol Vista Ski Area entrance. Follow signs east 1.5 miles to course. Grand ElkCourse name: Grand Elk Ranch & ClubWebsite: http://www.golfgrandcounty.com/grandelkAddress: 1300 Ten Mile Drive, Granby, CO 80446Phone number: 887-389-9333Type: Semi-private, 18-hole regulationTee Times: Call 970-887-9122 for reservations. Seven days in advance. Members only until 10 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.Dress Code: Collared shirt, no jeans.Designer: Craig Stadler and Tripp Davis Tee boxes: Women Gold 5,092 yards; Front 9, 34.5/120; Back 9, 35.0/128; 18-hole, 69.5/124Women Green 5,611 yards; Front 9, 35.5/126; Back 9, 36.1/134; 18-hole, 71.6/130Women White 6,233 yards; Front 9, 37.5/132; Back 9, 37.4/145; 18-hole, 74.9/139Men Green 5,611 yards; Front 9, 32.9/116; Back 9, 33.9/114; 18-hole, 66.8/115Men White 6,233 yards; Front 9, 34.6/126; Back 9, 34.7/116; 18-hole, 69.3/120Men Blue 6,608 yards; Front 9, 35.4/126; Back 9, 35.8/128; 18-hole, 71.2/127Men Black 6,997 yards; Front 9, 36.1/127; Back 9, 36.4/132; 18-hole, 72.5/130Practice: Grass driving range and putting green.Amenities: Clubhouse and restaurant, on-site catering and GPS included with cart fee.Misc. info: The Grand Elk Golf Course is a par 71 masterwork playing 7,144 yards from the back tees. Echoing the attributes of traditional Heathland courses in the British Isles, the course features gently rolling fairways and strategically placed hazards. The variations in tee boxes will provide a test for the low handicapper or a fun round for the recreational golfer.Directions: Take I-70 west to Hwy 40. Take Hwy 40 north to Granby. The course is southwest of Granby off of Hwy 40. Turn left on Thompson Drive (at City Market), then right on Ten Mile Drive and follow to clubhouse.

Grand County Real Estate Transactions, Nov.10-Nov. 16, 2013

Nov. 10- Nov. 16 Winter Park Ranch 2nd Filing, Lot 22, Block 4 – Terrance and Patricia Stewart to Robbers Roost LLC, $89,000 Meadow Ridge Lodges Court 17, Unit 4 – James Cartwright to Robert and Yolanda Christiansen, $113,500 Winter Park Highlands Unit 1, Lot 55 – Timothy Ferrell to Lynn Hanna, $155,000 Kicking Horse Lodges Unit 3 202, Lot 3 – Deutsche Bank National Trust Company TSTE, Thornburg Mortgage Securities Trust 2003-6, Mortgage Backed Notes Series 2003-6 to Shawn and Erica Dufford, $166,750 Hi Country Haus Bldg 5, Unit 7 8 – Mark and Caroline Goosman to Michael and Gretchen Mullen, $157,500 Pine Beach Subdivision Lot 5A, Block 7 – Harold and Diane Leid to Christopher Oliver, $340,000 Hillside Addition to Pine Beach Lot 1, Block 5 – Kristol Jaskul to John and Bonnie DeAgostino, $190,000 Aspen Pine Acres Subdivision Lot 19 – Edmund Couch to Rodney and Jill Archer, $609,000 Big Horn Park Filing #2, Lot 17 – Edward and Rosemary Dreher to Andrew and Caral Jeanjaquet, $99,300 Iron Horse Building D, Condo Unit 3014 – Wayne Leiser to Cristina Woodings, $103,400 Iron Horse Building C, Condo Unit 2053 – Terrance Ryan to Peter and Christina Logi, $110,000 Grand Lake Lot 16, Block 22 – LJH LLC Colorado Limited Liability Company to Donald and Linda Dickinson, $320,000 Inn at SilverCreek PH I Condo Unit 128 – Mary Jo Wiley Revocable Living Trust to Andrew and Veronica Mericle, $21,400

MTA kicks off summer tourist season with Ride the Rockies

Ride the Rockies rolled through Grand County last week as thousands of cyclists pedaled their way from Copper Mountain to Grand Lake. To help ride participants, support teams and event staff get around Ride organizers hired bus companies from the high country to shuttle people between various locations on the route. Grand County's Mountain Transit Adventures (MTA) was among those called upon to help. "Ride the Rockies came to Grand Lake and they asked if we could supply transit," said MTA owner Kurt Spencer. "They called the next day and asked if we could go to Aspen. They called again the next day and asked if we could supply two busses." Eventually MTA's efforts would include four busses and a twelve-passenger van. Their work kicked off in Aspen with the beginning of the Ride and continued through the tour's second stop in Carbondale. Spencer speculated MTA moved approximately 3,000 people over the course of two days between Aspen and Carbondale. As the riders on the tour moved into Grand County on the fourth day of Ride the Rockies MTA kicked into high gear. Spencer estimated the business transported between 1,500 and 2,000 people in the Grand Lake area alone. Spencer said Ride the Rockies was, "a wonderful way to get our season started. It was a test of our system." The MTA crew is staffed with five CDL drivers. Spencer said most of his drivers work for the East Grand School District during the school year. The business utilizes a total of five busses and two twelve-passenger vans to move folks around. Mountain Transit Adventures began operating last year and is a business venture between Valley Taxi owner Kurt Spencer and Elmer Lanzi of the Grand Lake area. Spencer recently leased out his Valley Taxi business and is focused full time on MTA. Former Grand Lake Trustee Elmer Lanzi purchased two busses in late 2014 with plans of creating MTA. Last summer the bussing service operated regular bus routes in the Grand Lake area with prescheduled stops at specific locations. The initial business model for MTA was not particularly successful. At the end of last summer Lanzi described the season as, "disappointing". Spencer echoed his opinion. "Our dismal season last year has completely turned around this year," said Spencer. "We are already looking at an almost completely full scheduled and we have barely begun the summer." The company's new business model moved away from standard bussing routes to a charter based service wherein customers booked trips to and from their own desired locations. Spencer said MTA is focusing more on groups and is already doing brisk business with wedding parties. The bussing service began operations again this summer on June 1 and is booked with wedding parties every weekend for the summer. Spencer said MTA is also looking into excursions and will be expanding their market beyond Grand County, providing transportation to places like Coors Field, Red Rocks and other locations along the Front Range. Spencer said MTA is also available for brewery tours and dispensary tours but pointed out that while passengers are allowed to drink on a chartered bus they are not allowed to smoke marijuana. In talking about the future outlook for MTA Spencer said, "it is definitely an improvement from last year. We have a serious business going. We have a little niche we can fill."