Rep. Cory Gardner visits Granby Library during campaign swing | SkyHiNews.com

Rep. Cory Gardner visits Granby Library during campaign swing

U.S. Senate candidate Cory Gardner made a pit stop at the Granby Library while on the stump during the weekend. Gardner, a Republican and representative for Colorado's 4th District, is hoping to unseat incumbent U.S. Sen. Mark Udall in November. Speaking before a crowd of about 80 people on Saturday, Aug. 9, Gardner, of Yuma, touted his "small town" approach to government, stating, "It's about what we can do to get government out of the way and let America work." Gardner admitted that the contest will be a "tight race all the way through," citing different polls that show both him and Sen. Udall ahead. Detailing his "four corners" plan, Gardner described his stance on economic growth, energy development, education and environmental conservation. Gardner's comments in favor of tax reform garnered vocal approval from the audience, saying the country and Colorado needed a "flatter, fair tax code" with a lower corporate tax rate. He also spoke in favor of developing more liquid natural gas reserves and selling them to U.S. allies, including Ukraine, to reduce dependence on foreign energy. Speaking on North American energy independence. Gardner described his philosophy as an "all of the above" approach to energy, including both renewable energy and fossil fuels. Gardner's thoughts about education centered on increasing student loan interest rate deductibles and promoting local school district independence. He also mentioned the Making College Affordable Act, a bill that Gardner introduced last year, which sought to amend Internal Revenue Service code to make some education savings accounts more accessible. The bill looks unlikely to make it past the House. The final corner of Gardner's plan focused on environmental conservation, which Gardner described as balancing economic use with the environment. He described his bipartisan efforts to enact new energy savings performance contracts, which he said could save the country around $20 billion. Obamacare, Immigration Responding to audience questions, Gardner was quick to attack Sen. Udall on his support for the Affordable Care Act, which Gardner said he is in favor of repealing. Gardner told the Sky-Hi News that he didn't believe the system before Obamacare was working. "That's why we have to replace it with something that actually works to lower the cost of care and increase the quality of care," Gardner said. He suggested starting with medical malpractice reform, allowing insurance sales across state lines and greater utilization of health savings accounts. Gardner also called the country's immigration system "completely broken," stating the country needs a "meaningful guest worker program" before border security can be addressed. "There will always be a need for labor," Gardner said, "and you're never going to meet that if you don't have a workable guest worker program at the same time." Hank Shell can be reached at 970-887-3334 ext. 19610.

Gardner announces committee assignments

U.S. Senator Cory Gardner, from Colorado,  announced he will be joining the Budget Committee and continue serving on the Foreign Relations Committee, Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and the Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. "I look forward to serving on the Budget Committee and working to get our fiscal house in order and address years of the Obama Administration's reckless spending," said Gardner. "In addition to joining the Budget Committee, I'm grateful to continue serving on the Foreign Relations Committee, the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and the Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. My committee assignments provide Coloradans a voice in shaping federal policy on important issues and significant challenges facing our country, and I'm eager to get to work."

Shaffer to remain Senate president

LONGMONT – Brandon Shaffer plans to remain president of the Colorado Senate while he challenges Republican U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner next year. The Democrat said Tuesday he decided to run against Gardner in Colorado’s 4th Congressional District because he thinks Washington needs a more congenial tone. Shaffer says Gardner has spent too much time in Washington, even though Gardner is serving his first term. Shaffer pointed out that Gardner worked in Washington before being elected to Congress and before serving in the state Legislature. “He’s spent more time in Washington, D.C., as an adult than he has in Colorado,” said Shaffer, who studied law with Gardner at the University of Colorado. Shaffer announced his expected candidacy on YouTube on Monday. The 4th District is the state’s second-largest, stretching from Fort Collins to the Wyoming state line. It also includes the easternmost part of the state along the Kansas border. The district is among Colorado’s most Republican, with a strong GOP advantage in voting registration. Among the few successes Democrats had here came in 2008, when Democrat Betsy Markey knocked off Republican Marilyn Musgrave, a social conservative with strong stances against abortion and gay marriage. Markey was soundly defeated last year by Gardner, a former state lawmaker who avoided talking about social wedge issues. In an interview with The Associated Press, Shaffer said he hopes to take back the seat next year with a strong ground game. He pointed out that 70,000 fewer people voted in the 2010 election than in 2008 and said, “I suspect I’ll knock on 70,000 doors.” Shaffer did not guess how much money he’d need to raise to knock off Gardner. A big unknown in the race is what the 4th District will look like. Democrats and Republicans proposed wildly different congressional district lines, prompting GOP lawmakers to accuse Shaffer of trying to draw himself a friendly district to challenge Gardner. Lawmakers were unable to agree, and the district lines will be decided by a court. Shaffer said he’s committed to running in the 4th District, even if the court draws his Longmont home out of the district. House members are required to live in the state they represent, but not the district. Shaffer dismissed GOP allegations that he tried to steer Senate Democrats to support a map increasing his political chances. “I think it’s a tired conversation right now,” Shaffer said. Shaffer did not criticize any specific votes of Gardner’s but described broadly how he’d be different. Shaffer said he would consider supporting a balanced budget amendment but isn’t prepared to take a position on what Congress should do on the debt ceiling. Gardner has said the debt ceiling should not be raised. In 2009, Shaffer angered Republicans in the state Senate when he cut off debate and helped Democrats loosen a restriction on growth in the state’s general fund to no more than 6 percent a year. Shaffer said he would vote to repeal the Defense of Marriage Act, a federal law that defines marriage as being between a man and a woman, and would support the DREAM Act, legislation that would provide a path to legalization for certain young people brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents. Gardner opposes both ideas. Shaffer did not take a position on climate-change legislation that divided Gardner and Markey. Shaffer said he’s not sure whether he supports cap-and-trade plans to reduce carbon emissions, and he did not say whether he agreed with Gardner’s vote to curtail the Environmental Protection Agency as it seeks to reduce power plants’ emissions of carbon dioxide, the chief greenhouse gas. Gardner was in Washington Tuesday as the House was in session. A spokeswoman did not immediately return a call for comment on Shaffer’s candidacy. The National Republican Congressional Committee put out a statement Tuesday describing Shaffer as a free spender who “led Colorado down a path to economic ruin.” Spokesman Tyler Houlton pointed out that Shaffer supported tax increases including a sales tax on agricultural products; Gardner voted against that bill last year.

Muftic: Cory Gardner a red flag for the middle

Cory Gardner, opposing Democratic Sen. Mark Udall in Colorado, is ranked as the 10th most conservative member of Congress. Colorado is hardly the 10th most conservative state in the union. Gardner sounds and looks moderate, but his legislative positions were, are, and would align closely to his Tea Party House colleagues. This election is also about electing a senator for the next six years who will represent your views and will be voting to determine Supreme Court replacements. Gardner's and Udall's visions of freedom are very different. Udall promotes freedom for individuals from an intrusive government, a maverick leader in the Senate against overreaching NSA surveillance. He is a strong advocate for the ability for women and men to choose their reproduction schedules and whom they marry. Freedom for Udall also means freedom from worry about affording health care and college for their kids. Gardner's vision of freedom is to gut environmental laws and favor tax policies for business while supporting greater government interference in choices individuals can make. His position on reproductive rights and marriage equality are the most extreme of any, even criminalizing abortions and doctors, and opposes birth control practices that interfere with his belief that life begins at conception. The U.S. unemployment rate is now back to pre-crash levels, and in Colorado it is below the national average. The deficit has been cut in half and the national economy is growing at 3 percent. Colorado has the highest economic growth in the nation, which is not only due to an improving national economy, but to a booming energy sector. Science denier Gardner is not even sure humans cause global warming. Mark Udall prizes a balanced approach to natural resource development, and Colorado's growth is evidence that approach can work. Gardner, unlike Udall, has voted in Congress to make it even more difficult for the middle income earners to recover from the Great Recession. He has voted to cut Pell grants and opposed decreasing interest rates on student loans or refinancing student loans to lower rates. Most Colorado families depend upon women working, but Gardner has voted against raising the minimum wage or furthering equal pay for women in the workforce. One of the most underrated boosts to middle income earners is the ACA (Obamacare), which both the GOP and Gardner still want to repeal. Gardner offers no alternative, no fixes no workable way to pay for covering pre-existing conditions. He has no viable plans to make health insurance affordable for 30 million Americans, mostly middle income, who once again would have to choose between losing their home or health care treatment because they could not qualify for or afford insurance. No traditional Medicare coverage was lost due to the ACA (contrary to a very misleading Gardner ad), and the ACA added 14 years to the life of Medicare. Gardner supports changing the efficiently administered Medicare program to provide a voucher system and block grants to states that upends a system that now guarantees coverage that keeps up with costs and gives stability to co-pays. For more, visit http://www.mufticforumblog.blogspot.com.

Grand County high school sports results, Feb. 4

Tuesday, Feb. 4 Boys Basketball Platte Canyon 53, Middle Park 45 Girls Basketball Middle Park 57, Platte Canyon 17 Wrestling Middle Park 36, Lutheran-Parker 12 106: Henry Hoyhtya (MP) pinned Travis Simmons (LP) 5:12. 132: Bryce Weimer (MP) forfeit. 138: Ben Jacobs (MP) forfeit. 152: Adam Visconti (MP) forfeit. 160: Jesse Corder (MP) forfeit. 170: London Worrell (LP) pinned Victor Gardner (MP) 2:41. 195: A.C. Landrey (LP) pinned Daniel Kamer (MP) 5:03. 285: Justin Halley (MP) forfeit. Faith Christian 57, Middle Park 15 106: Luc Herrera (FC) pinned Henry Hoyhtya (MP) 1:15. 113: Brendan Dejonge (FC) forfeit. 120: Joshua Marquardt (FC) forfeit. 126: Luke Martin (FC) forfeit. 132: Bryce Weimer (MP) pinned John Campisi (FC) 1:14. 138: Markus Jones (FC) pinned Ben Jacobs (MP) 0:12. 145: Trevor Olsen (FC) forfeit. 152: Adam Visconti (MP) decision Clark Kelly (FC) 10-3. 170: Mac Hansen (FC) decision Jesse Corder (MP) 12-8. 182: Seth Von Rentzell (FC) forfeit. 195: Chris Siebarth (FC) pinned Daniel Kamer (MP) 2:45. 220: John Ramstead (FC) forfeit. 285: Justin Halley (MP) forfeit.

Is legal marijuana harming Colorado business?

EAGLE COUNTY — Led Gardner is worried. Gardner, a broker with Slifer Smith & Frampton, is concerned that legal marijuana in Colorado may prompt some people ­— specifically some of the valley's high-end clients — to take their business elsewhere. Gardner isn't alone in that concern, but he has a first-hand story to tell. He's been showing expensive property to a family from the eastern part of the U.S. and in an email wrote that family members are concerned about the atmosphere legal marijuana is creating in what they believe is a "family-friendly" resort. "They told me it might not be wise to buy here because of the law," Gardner said. Gardner was particularly concerned when the Vail Daily put news about marijuana on the front page, a sentiment echoed by other brokers. "It plays into fears many of our clients have," he said. "There are a number of instances I've heard about from other people." SOME SAY FEARS OVERBLOWN But other people in the business of catering to high-end clients believe those fears are overblown. "I haven't heard a word in here except my husband joking about it," Sunny Smith said. Smith's husband, Shelton, owns the Shelton Smith Collection, a gallery of high-end art and artifacts near the Covered Bridge on Bridge Street. The gallery, like many shops selling expensive things, relies on building relationships with people. And, Smith said, she hasn't heard any of those people mention the law at all. Craig Denton hasn't heard anything, either. Denton, a broker with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Colorado Properties who specializes in resort property, acknowledges that he went to college at the University of California at Berkeley in the 1970s, so he may have a more live-and-let-live attitude about marijuana use. But, he said, none of his clients have mentioned the law. "Do they think it doesn't exist elsewhere? It's been around forever," Denton said of people who may worry about legal marijuana. 'HARDLY ANY DIFFERENT' Ron Byrne, owner of a Vail-based real estate company that bears his name, has been selling expensive real estate in the valley for decades, but describes himself as "an old hippie" and "a rock 'n' roller from Detroit." But, Byrne said, none of his clients have mentioned the law, either. "It's so controlled, it's hardly any different than it was before," Byrne said. "By putting it front and center … that may make it slightly safer." Bryne said the current publicity about the law may end up being "much ado about nothing" — that the opening of a new shop in a few years won't raise eyebrows any more than the opening of a new liquor store. Gardner agreed with Byrne on that point. But the here and now is a different situation. THOSE WHO VOTED 'NO' While Colorado voters in 2012 decisively passed Amendment 64 — the amendment to the state constitution that legalized the use and sale of marijuana for recreational use — more than 40 percent of state voters said "no" to the measure. A significant number of locals disagreed, and many are saying the same things Gardner is now. "I'm being asked about it by families who could just as easily got to Park City," Gardner said. "And what do you say to your high schooler who says, 'It's OK (to use pot) — it's legal,'" Gardner said. "The issue is why would we want to sensationalize it?"

Is legal marijuana harming Colorado business?

EAGLE COUNTY — Led Gardner is worried. Gardner, a broker with Slifer Smith & Frampton, is concerned that legal marijuana in Colorado may prompt some people ­— specifically some of the valley's high-end clients — to take their business elsewhere. Gardner isn't alone in that concern, but he has a first-hand story to tell. He's been showing expensive property to a family from the eastern part of the U.S. and in an email wrote that family members are concerned about the atmosphere legal marijuana is creating in what they believe is a "family-friendly" resort. "They told me it might not be wise to buy here because of the law," Gardner said. Gardner was particularly concerned when the Vail Daily put news about marijuana on the front page, a sentiment echoed by other brokers. "It plays into fears many of our clients have," he said. "There are a number of instances I've heard about from other people." SOME SAY FEARS OVERBLOWN But other people in the business of catering to high-end clients believe those fears are overblown. "I haven't heard a word in here except my husband joking about it," Sunny Smith said. Smith's husband, Shelton, owns the Shelton Smith Collection, a gallery of high-end art and artifacts near the Covered Bridge on Bridge Street. The gallery, like many shops selling expensive things, relies on building relationships with people. And, Smith said, she hasn't heard any of those people mention the law at all. Craig Denton hasn't heard anything, either. Denton, a broker with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Colorado Properties who specializes in resort property, acknowledges that he went to college at the University of California at Berkeley in the 1970s, so he may have a more live-and-let-live attitude about marijuana use. But, he said, none of his clients have mentioned the law. "Do they think it doesn't exist elsewhere? It's been around forever," Denton said of people who may worry about legal marijuana. 'HARDLY ANY DIFFERENT' Ron Byrne, owner of a Vail-based real estate company that bears his name, has been selling expensive real estate in the valley for decades, but describes himself as "an old hippie" and "a rock 'n' roller from Detroit." But, Byrne said, none of his clients have mentioned the law, either. "It's so controlled, it's hardly any different than it was before," Byrne said. "By putting it front and center … that may make it slightly safer." Bryne said the current publicity about the law may end up being "much ado about nothing" — that the opening of a new shop in a few years won't raise eyebrows any more than the opening of a new liquor store. Gardner agreed with Byrne on that point. But the here and now is a different situation. THOSE WHO VOTED 'NO' While Colorado voters in 2012 decisively passed Amendment 64 — the amendment to the state constitution that legalized the use and sale of marijuana for recreational use — more than 40 percent of state voters said "no" to the measure. A significant number of locals disagreed, and many are saying the same things Gardner is now. "I'm being asked about it by families who could just as easily got to Park City," Gardner said. "And what do you say to your high schooler who says, 'It's OK (to use pot) — it's legal,'" Gardner said. "The issue is why would we want to sensationalize it?"

Obituary: William J. Gardner

William J. Gardner of Granby passed away in Aurora on April 12, 2008 at the age of 76. He was born on June 10, 1931 in Leon, Iowa to Lynn W. and Hazel M. (Lewis) Gardner. He served his country honorably in the U.S. Navy and Air Force. In June 1964, he was united in marriage to Katherine “Katie” Hill at Walden. He worked for many years with Mountain Bell, the Henderson Mine, Town of Granby, and most recently Ace Hardware. He is preceded in death by his parents, a sister Florence Layne and a brother Gary Gardner. William is survived by his wife, Katie, his children Wayen D. Gardner and wife Sylvia, Rhonda L. May, Terri A. Mauiro and husband Mike, Rebecca D. Giuliano and husband Leonard, Kevin H. Gardner, William J. Gardener and wife Mary, and Jason W. Gardner and wife Amanda; his brother Doyle Gardner; 19 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Many nieces and newphews and beloved friends also survive him. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, April 18, 2008 at the Middle Park High School in Granby with Pastor Joelle Suel officiating. Burial will be in the Hill Family Cemetery. Memorial donations may be sent in William’s Home to the Colorado State Veteran’s Home – Heritage Right, 1919 Quentin St., Aurora, CO 80011. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the care and direction of Foran-Schoenfeld Mortuary – Hot Sulphur Springs.

Kremmling – Mustangs earn two wins over Panthers in raucous atmosphere

In an atmosphere befitting the nature of a long-time county rivalry, the West Grand Mustangs pulled out a pair of high school basketball wins over the Middle Park Panthers. The Mustangs and the Panthers squared off in a non-league contest on Tuesday night, Jan. 26, in Kremmling and fought tooth and nail in both girls and boys basketball. The West Grand girls won their game 36-30, while the boys from Kremmling won 41-35. The entire north side of the stands was filled primarily with students from both schools while the south stands were equally packed with fans from both communities. The crowd was raucous and the noise constant. Coaches from both schools described the atmosphere as electric. It had the feel of a playoff game at a neutral site as both schools had an equal number of partisan followers. The girls’ game started as a deliberate, defensive matchup as both schools carefully looked for opportunities on offense. The Mustangs led after one quarter, 5-2, and at the half, 13-10. Neither team could gain a significant advantage. West Grand visited the freethrow line more frequently than the Panthers, and the Mustangs scored seven of their first half points from the freethrow line. In the second half, West Grand was able to slowly build a 10-point lead and appeared to be ready to salt the game away. The Panthers displayed their character and fight by rallying to get within four points. Down the stretch, Taylor Pesch, Melissa Kraker and Brook Cecil all hit crucial freethrows to keep the Panthers from overcoming the Mustangs. For the Panthers, Lihla Clancy was the leading scorer with 10 points while Moreya Gardner scored six points in the game. West Grand was led in scoring by Cecil, who scored 16 points. Kraker and Hannah Howell, who scored seven points apiece, were next highest scorers for the Mustangs. Boys square off For those who thought the energy had been spent during the girls’ game, the surprise was that the boys’ game generated an equal amount of noise and enthusiasm. The game was also just as hard-fought and close as the girls game. Middle Park, which had easily defeated West Grand in a pre-Christmas tournament in Granby, jumped to an 11-9 point first quarter lead. In the second quarter, the Panthers were hampered by the fact that leading scorer, Jordan Reynolds picked up four fouls in the first half. The Mustangs outscored the Panthers, 17-7, in the frame and built a 26-18 lead. Both teams came out in the second half with defensive adjustments, and Middle Park was able to cut four points off of the lead and narrow the gap to, 30-26, heading into the final quarter. Each team gave it a supreme effort in the fourth quarter and the Mustangs were able to outscored Middle Park, 11-9, and secure the final advantage. Leading the way in scoring for West Grand was Stetson Sabados with 14 points, Fletcher Flanigan with 10 points and Travis Gore with nine points. Ross Eaton was the leading scorer for Middle Park with 16 points, while Reynolds had eight points in the game for the Panthers.

Granby Adult Volleyball standings

The Granby Adult Co-ed Volleyball League continued its season with some hard hitting competition. Results of last week’s games were:Sagebrush BBQ & Grill over Trash Company, 3 – 0.Canucks beat Trash Company, 3 – 0.Canucks defeated Drowsy Water Ranch, 2 – 1.Sagebrush BBQ & Grill downed Drowsy Water Ranch, 2 – 1.TeamWLCanucks113Sagebrush BBQ/Grill95Drowsy Water Ranch77The Trash Company113